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Federal Privacy Law Efforts Move Forward in Congress | Wiley Rein LLP - JDSupra

Federal Privacy Law Efforts Move Forward in Congress | Wiley Rein LLP - JDSupra | The MarTech Alert | Scoop.it
As fall has arrived, so has a flurry of privacy activity on Capitol Hill.  Though this Congress is highly unlikely to pass any privacy legislation before the end of the Term, the latest developments reflect efforts by key Senators to find areas of agreement and establish the framework for federal privacy legislation to be considered in the next Congress.  Notably, the Chairman of the Senate Commerce Committee and other key Republican Senators released a final version of a draft privacy bill that would significantly transform privacy law nationwide, while also taking aim at use of online algorithms.  While Senate Democrats have offered proposals that would go further, the Senate Commerce Committee held a hearing on Wednesday that was aimed at attempting to find common ground for legislation, including by hearing testimony from a bipartisan group of former Federal Trade Commissioners—including three former Chairs—who were broadly supportive of the proposed legislation.  Important differences remain, but given the repeated calls for a federal privacy law from a diverse group of stakeholders and the pressure for a federal solution in light of individual state privacy efforts, companies should pay close attention to federal proposals that increasingly appear to mark a baseline for a federal privacy law. 
CYDigital/marteq.ios insight:

It's a very fair assumption that this bill will never see the light of day, and should the Senate switch over to Blue control, the Dems bill may never see the light of day. Recommendation: focus on what CA is doing, and act accordingly.

 

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Consumer Reports Study Shows California's Privacy Law Is A Poorly-Enforced Mess | Techdirt

Consumer Reports Study Shows California's Privacy Law Is A Poorly-Enforced Mess | Techdirt | The MarTech Alert | Scoop.it
A new report by Consumer Reports found the bill (surprise!) isn't really succeeding at its primary goal: clearly informing consumers what's going on in terms of access to their data, and making it easier to opt out of data collection and sale. This most basic provision also isn't being meaningfully enforced in any substantive way. The organization spent much of May testing numerous websites and found that actually trying to opt out of data collection and sales was either impossible, or very difficult to confirm with the companies in question:

Consumers struggled to locate the required links to opt out of the sale of their information. For 42.5% of sites tested, at least one of three testers was unable to find a DNS link. All three volunteers failed to find a “Do Not Sell” link on 12.6% of sites, and in several other cases one or two of three testers were unable to locate a link.
At least 14% of the time, burdensome or broken DNS processes prevented consumers from exercising their rights under the CCPA.
Consumers often didn’t know if their opt-out request was successful. Neither the CCPA nor the CCPA rules require companies to notify consumers when their request has been honored. As a result, about 46% of the time, consumers were left waiting or unsure about the status of their request. About 52% of the time, the tester was “somewhat dissatisfied” or “very dissatisfied” with opt-out processes.
CYDigital/marteq.ios insight:

This should not be a surprise, and is one of the driving reasons behind the forthcoming CPRA, where CA will have the resources to reinforce the law (vs. barely anything today).

 

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Big Tech Is Quiet in Data Privacy Initiative Fight - TechWire

Proposition 24 on the November ballot is pitched as an expansion of California’s already robust consumer data privacy law, an iron cuff on the claws of companies that profit handsomely from tracking and selling your online search, travel and purchase habits to marketers.

But the technology giants seemingly square in its sights — the likes of Facebook, Amazon and Google — haven’t shown up to the battlefield. Instead, those opposing the new California Privacy Rights Act are some of the same types of consumer, labor and civil rights advocates who support its predecessor.

“Proposition 24 is a wolf in sheep’s clothing,” said Richard Holober, president of the Consumer Federation of California and a leader of the "No on 24" effort. “It’s loaded with giveaways to tech companies.”

Big tech companies are standing down on Proposition 24 — data privacy is popular, fighting it is a bad look, and they're already abiding by similar rules in Europe. But criticism from those who would seem natural allies is “pretty disappointing.”
CYDigital/marteq.ios insight:

For us marketer, as we need to know is this: assume it's going to happen, and plan accordingly.

 

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EDPB Publishes Draft Guidelines on the Targeting of Social Media Users - Inside Privacy

On 7 September 2020, the European Data Protection Board (“EDPB”) adopted draft guidelines on the targeting of social media users (the “Guidelines”).  The Guidelines aim to clarify the roles and responsibilities of social media providers and “targeters” with regard to the processing of personal data for the purposes of targeting social media users.

Targeting services allow natural or legal persons (i.e., targeters) to communicate specific messages to the users of social media in order to advance commercial, political or other interests.  The Guidelines state that the mechanisms social media providers can use to target users, as well as the underlying processing activities, may pose significant risks to users, including loss of control over their personal data, discrimination and exclusion as a result of targeting on the basis of special categories of personal data, and manipulation through misinformation.  The Guidelines also raise specific concerns in relation to children.
CYDigital/marteq.ios insight:

This too will impact marketers, and just a matter of time before CA implements similar legislation.

 

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Treat CPRA As If It Will Pass - Dev Pro Journal

Treat CPRA As If It Will Pass - Dev Pro Journal | The MarTech Alert | Scoop.it
The European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), implemented in 2018, set the bar for data protection worldwide. This November’s proposed California Privacy Rights Act (CPRA) closely mirrors the GDPR’s approach with three mainline items not included in the existing California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA). These additions elevate the privacy protections of California residents.

“Whether your business is in California or not, the first step is to determine whether or not you need to be compliant. This requires leaders to know what type of data they are managing and whether there are any California citizens within their data sets,” says Shawn Rogers, VP of Corporate Marketing at TIBCO, a provider of big data and software integrations.

Privacy and data protection matter to consumers. In a 2019 California Privacy survey, 88 percent of residents backed the CCPA, and many supported more federal oversight on privacy laws. In addition, privacy and data protection directly correlates with the purchasing patterns of Americans.
CYDigital/marteq.ios insight:

Damn right! Configure now so that you are prepared. Consider that the CPRA is akin to GDPR, and if you step one toe into the CA market, you must be compliant.

 

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Gartner Projects Major Jump in Data Privacy Regulations; From 10% of the World Covered in 2020 to 65% in 2023 - CPO Magazine

Gartner Projects Major Jump in Data Privacy Regulations; From 10% of the World Covered in 2020 to 65% in 2023 - CPO Magazine | The MarTech Alert | Scoop.it
Global research firm Gartner recently conducted its annual Security & Risk Management Summit, and perhaps the biggest headline to come out of it was the projection that the majority of the world will be covered by data privacy regulations by 2023.

This would be a very substantial jump in a relatively short period of time. At present, only about 10% of the world has strong privacy regulations akin to the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). Gartner believes that the GDPR will be the specific model upon which most of these new privacy regulations are based.

The EU standards essentially require other countries to implement privacy regulations that are on par with the terms of the GDPR. The recent Privacy Shield issue that has been playing out between the EU and US has been illustrative of this; EU court rulings have determined that the US is essentially going to have to pass its own federal-level data privacy regulations before EU personal data can once again be sent there.
CYDigital/marteq.ios insight:

This is a direct shot across the marketer's bow. Heed it. But see it as an opportunity to differentiate yourself. Contact me so that I can show you how.

 

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The California Consumer Privacy Act Business-to-Business and Human Resources Data Limited Exemptions Extended One More Year | Knobbe Martens - JDSupra

The California Consumer Privacy Act Business-to-Business and Human Resources Data Limited Exemptions Extended One More Year | Knobbe Martens - JDSupra | The MarTech Alert | Scoop.it
The California Legislature has delayed its plans to expand the scope of the California Consumer Privacy Act (“CCPA”) and make all of its provisions apply to personal information related to business-to-business communications and transactions and human resources data. When the CCPA went into effect on January 1, 2020, business-to-business and human resources data were subject to limited exemptions that were set to expire on December 31, 2020. As you can imagine, because nearly all businesses subject to the CCPA could (and likely did) take advantage of these exemptions, there was concern regarding whether the exemptions would phase-out end of the year or become permanent law.

Businesses have finally received an answer and can now take a sigh of relief. On August 31, 2020, the California Legislature passed Assembly Bill 1281, which extends these exemptions to December 31, 2021. This announcement was much needed relief, and provided some economic certainty during these financially trying times. Passage of Assembly Bill 1281 also means that the California Legislature will likely not pass comprehensive data privacy laws related to human resources data, as some privacy professionals anticipated would occur in 2020.
CYDigital/marteq.ios insight:

A bit of a reprieve for the B2B marketer, so please don't waste the opportunity to pull things together.

 

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CPRA Pushes "Privacy by Design" Shift for Software Developers - Dev Pro Journal

CPRA Pushes "Privacy by Design" Shift for Software Developers - Dev Pro Journal | The MarTech Alert | Scoop.it
The California Privacy Rights Act (CPRA) is on the ballot this November, and if it passes will expand the privacy rights within the existing California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA).  The new law builds on the principles of data minimization, greater consumer control of personal data, and increased transparency on data retention and potential uses. It could have unforeseen implications for many companies who think their data is secure, and new opportunities for software developers and ISVs moving to “privacy by design” software development.

Compliance with the CPRA guidelines will require operational and system upgrades in data capture, storage, governance and security for all three domains. The main technologies needs are around:
Data mapping and cataloging. Personal data must be tracked across an organization’s entire IT landscape. 
Data minimization. A major component of the CPRA and similar privacy laws is the belief that organizations should only collect the bare minimum of data required to complete an interaction or transaction.
Data anonymity. In any instance when data is not critical to the function of the application, it should be anonymized in order to reduce the risk of data breaches.
Data access requests. Gartner estimates that every data access request costs about $1,400 when processed manually. Organizations will look for solutions that manage data access and sharing securely and efficiently.
CYDigital/marteq.ios insight:

The forthcoming CPRA will turn data collection completely upside down, especially for marketers. The sooner you give data ownership to the consumer, the better your relationship with the consumer and your ability to adjust to the CPRA.

 

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How U.S. tech policy could change if Democrats win back the Senate - VentureBeat

How U.S. tech policy could change if Democrats win back the Senate - VentureBeat | The MarTech Alert | Scoop.it
The United States still lacks personal data privacy laws that would set ground rules for the way private companies treat data collected about individual consumers. General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) in the European Union and the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) in California are major steps toward strengthening such privacy protections.

Malkia Devich-Cyril, founder of Media Justice, says comprehensive data privacy reform is one type of legislation with a lot of bills on the table to draw inspiration from. The two most prominent in recent memory are the Consumer Online Privacy Rights Act (COPRA) and the Consumer Data Privacy Act (CDPA). The bills, put forward by Democrats and Republicans, respectively, protect privacy rights for individuals and grant more resources for Federal Trade Commission (FTC) regulators. A major difference between the two is that COPRA enshrines the private right of action, or the ability to sue an individual company like Facebook or Google when data privacy rights are violated on their platforms.
CYDigital/marteq.ios insight:

It'll get watered-down at the federal level, so the best bet is to align policies and procedures with the forthcoming CPRA.

 

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SAFE DATA Act Joins Crowded Field of Privacy Bills - Decipher

SAFE DATA Act Joins Crowded Field of Privacy Bills - Decipher | The MarTech Alert | Scoop.it
Four Republican senators have introduced a new privacy bill that is aimed at limiting corporate use of consumer data, but it is based on the outmoded idea of notice-and-consent and also would prevent states from passing their own privacy or data security laws.

The bill is the latest in what has become a deluge of privacy legislation in the current Congress, many of which share common traits and basic principles. Like many of the existing bills, the SAFE DATA Act introduced last week gives individuals the opportunity to see, correct, or delete data collected on them by companies and prohibits companies from refusing to provide goods or services to people who don’t agree to their privacy policies. However, the bill employs notice-and-consent as the basis for data collection, a notion that is considered ineffective for actually informing people about what data a provider is collecting and what options they have as a result. Few people take the time to read privacy policies and even if they do, the language is very difficult to decipher. 

While many of the provisions in the new bill are similar to those in existing bills, the SAFE DATA Act also includes a section that explicitly prohibits state legislatures from passing new privacy or data security laws, or from enforcing existing laws. The clause does not apply to state data-breach notification laws, however.
CYDigital/marteq.ios insight:

Won't happen, as there is a clear infringement on state's rights. But watch this space, especially if the Senate does not shift to the Dems.

 

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What CCPA-affected businesses need to know about California’s next privacy initiative | ComplianceWeek

What CCPA-affected businesses need to know about California’s next privacy initiative | ComplianceWeek | The MarTech Alert | Scoop.it
Businesses with operations in California should expect their data privacy compliance obligations to get a lot more complicated next year. That’s because voters may choose to replace the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA)—the country’s only currently enacted data privacy law, which took effect Jan. 1—with the California Privacy Rights Act (CPRA). The Nov. 3 California state ballot asks voters to approve Proposition 24 and enact the CPRA. The law would expand the definition of sensitive personal information and add a host of new data collection, use, and storage compliance requirements for businesses, many of which are still struggling to comply with the CCPA.

In addition, Proposition 24 proposes to take regulation and enforcement of the CCPA away from the California Attorney General’s Office and place those functions in the hands of a new independent entity, the California Privacy Protection Agency (PPA).

While the CPRA would take effect Jan. 1, 2023, the new agency could begin work as soon as July 1, 2021, supported with $10 million a year in state funds. And that new agency would enforce the CCPA until the CPRA takes effect.
CYDigital/marteq.ios insight:

Consider CPRA, which will pass, to be as onerous as the GDPR. And with $10M budget, it will be enforceable via a staff of attorneys. NOTE: the new agency could start up next year, enforcing CCPA (which does not have a budget to ensure enforcement). You've been warned.

 

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Two New Guidelines by the EDPB: Targeting of Social Media Users and the Concepts of Controllers and Processors - Lexology

Two New Guidelines by the EDPB: Targeting of Social Media Users and the Concepts of Controllers and Processors - Lexology | The MarTech Alert | Scoop.it
The new guidelines on targeting of social media analyses the various actors which are involved in targeting, which are divided to four categories: social media providers, social media users, targeters and other actors, such as data brokers and ad exchanges, which may be involved in the targeting process.

The main purpose of the guidelines is to clarify the roles and responsibilities of the social media providers and the targeters. In many cases both parties would be defined as joint controllers. The importance of correctly identifying these roles and responsibilities has been emphasized in judgements of the European Union's Court of Justice.

Three different mechanisms of targeting are addressed by the guidelines. The first is targeting on the basis of data provided by the user. The second mechanism is targeting based on the basis of observed data, which includes data that is provided by the user through the use of a service or device, or data that is collected by third parties. This category includes the use of technical measures such as pixels. The third mechanism is targeting based on inferred data. Profiling is typically involved in this mechanism, and assessment of automated decision making must be conducted to define whether it leads to legal or similarly significant effects.
CYDigital/marteq.ios insight:

GDPR constantly evolving. Note what's happening, and you have to assume the same will occur stateside.

 

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Proposition to Harden California Privacy Law Will Be on Ballot - GovTech

Proposition to Harden California Privacy Law Will Be on Ballot - GovTech | The MarTech Alert | Scoop.it
The California Consumer Privacy Act is a landmark. It gives Californians greater privacy protection than consumers anywhere this side of Europe.

But it's imperfect and vulnerable to gutting by business interests working their magic in the state Legislature. So Alastair Mactaggart, the wealthy real estate investor behind the privacy law, has put up a ballot initiative to strengthen the law and inoculate it from the mischief of business lobbies.

It will appear on the November ballot as Proposition 24. MacTaggart has funded the pro-24 campaign with about $5 million of his own funds so far. Business interests so far have kept a low profile on Proposition 24, but signs have emerged that they may already be sharpening their knives against it.
CYDigital/marteq.ios insight:

Possibly more changes afoot. It's a constantly moving target, and nothing has been shown to be anything but a constantly changing environment. Multiply this by 50 states, and it's damn near impossible...unless you turn the tables and give the consumer ownership over their own data.

 

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Bill Text - AB-2150 Corporate securities: limited exemption: study 

Existing law, the Corporate Securities Law of 1968, provides for the regulation of the issuance of corporate securities, requires the qualification of an offer or sale of securities, and provides for exemptions from qualification with the Commissioner of Business Oversight. Existing law defines a “security” to mean a note, stock, and, among other things, an investment contract. For the purposes of authorizing specified items that may be included in articles of incorporation, with regard to the keeping of certain records by a corporation that does not have outstanding securities listed on specified stock exchanges, existing law defines “blockchain technology” to mean a mathematically secured, chronological, and decentralized consensus ledger or database.


"This bill would require the Department of Business Oversight to conduct a study to determine the feasibility of enacting in California a measure equivalent to the Proposed Securities Act Rule 195–Time-Limited Exemption for Tokens, as specified, and to report its findings to the Legislature. The bill would require the study to evaluate certain subjects, including the potential benefits and costs of the exemption to the state. The bill would require the department to present the report to the Legislature on or before January 1, 2022, would prescribe certain subjects that report is to include, and would specify the method of its delivery."

CYDigital/marteq.ios insight:

CA's AB-2150, originally a bill to legislate the treatment of digital assets and when they would not be considered a security, is now scaled back to a study of the same. It's another step towards embracing digital currencies.

 

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Virginia Legislative Commission Set to Begin Look at Data Protection, Privacy - Lexology

Virginia Legislative Commission Set to Begin Look at Data Protection, Privacy - Lexology | The MarTech Alert | Scoop.it
The Data Protection and Privacy Advisory Committee is chaired by Delegate Hala Ayala (D) who is in her second term as a member of the House of Delegates and in her professional life is a cybersecurity specialist. She is a new member on JCOTS and is a recently announced candidate for the Democratic nomination for Lt. Governor in the 2021 election. The committee is expected to discuss the following bills from the 2020 legislative session:

HB473(Delegate Sickles): Personal data; Virginia Privacy Act. Gives consumers the right to access their data and determine if it has been sold to a data broker. The measure requires a controller (defined in the bill as a person that, alone or jointly with others, determines the purposes and means of the processing of personal data) to facilitate requests to exercise consumer rights regarding access, correction, deletion, restriction of processing, data portability, objection, and profiling. The measure applies to any legal entity that conducts business in the Commonwealth or produces products or services that are intentionally targeted to residents of the Commonwealth and that (a) controls or processes personal data of not fewer than 100,000 consumers or (b) derives over 50 percent of gross revenue from the sale of personal data and processes or controls personal data of not fewer than 25,000 customers.
CYDigital/marteq.ios insight:

We've been engaged with Commonwealth Delegates, and we believe that this is the first step towards a CCPA for Virginia, ultimately leading to a data dividends-like program.

 

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How organizations should now think about data protection - Lexology

How organizations should now think about data protection - Lexology | The MarTech Alert | Scoop.it
On 16 July 2020, the European Court of Justice (CJEU) invalidated the European Union (EU)-US Privacy Shield Decision, while upholding the validity of the Standard Contractual Clauses Decision (SCC Decision), and therefore the use of standard contractual clauses in order to transfer personal data to third countries.

We recommend a number of immediate steps for such organizations to take, including:

Re-examine data strategy, including any reliance on third parties
Update data mapping to ensure accurate data flow and volumes are based on current operating models
Consider whether the “Standard Contract Clauses” (SCCs) may be incorporated into current data transfer arrangements, acknowledging that the EU’s SCCs are due to be updated in the next couple of months
Consider the organizations’ risk tolerance for the uncertainty caused by the Privacy Shield Decision, including evaluating strategic options such as the process of establishing Binding Corporate Rules (BCRs) covering global data transfers within entities
Continue to monitor EU responses to the CJEU’s decision, including whether or not to grant a "grace period" for organizations previously relying on Privacy Shield
CYDigital/marteq.ios insight:

Rethink your approach to data privacy. Staying the current course will keep you on the path of continual change, adaptation, and with it, continued costs.

 

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Dangers of unfettered access to personally identifiable information - The Hill

Dangers of unfettered access to personally identifiable information - The Hill | The MarTech Alert | Scoop.it
In early 2019, members of Congress began to draft agreements on addressing privacy protections and PII, which included a Consumer Data Protection Act and Data Care Act. California also moved to strengthen privacy measures; two years ago it passed the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018. CCPA gives consumers more control over the personal information that businesses collect about them. 

CYDigital/marteq.ios insight:

It's coming, and it's needed. And once in place, the marketer's job becomes far harder.

 

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You Read the Privacy Policy, Right? Sure You Did. A New Federal Bill Seeks to Address the Transparency Gap. - Lexology

You Read the Privacy Policy, Right? Sure You Did. A New Federal Bill Seeks to Address the Transparency Gap. - Lexology | The MarTech Alert | Scoop.it
Only 22% of Americans report “often” or “always” reading online privacy policies, and that’s solely for websites which require browsers to affirmatively agree to a privacy policy (i.e., flashing a pop-up with some form of “check the box” affirmation). This does not engender much confidence that Americans are actively seeking out and consenting to the privacy policies embedded within the myriad of websites they visit on a daily basis. And who can blame them – a 2008 study estimated it would take 244 hours each year to read every privacy policy in full for all the websites an average web browser visited annually. 

So note the structural framework of U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown’s (D-Ohio) Data Accountability and Transparency Act of 2020 (DATA 2020): rather than maintaining the permissive data privacy legal framework which allows data processors to manage consumer personal data largely as they see fit, so long as they disclose their intentions in a lengthy privacy policy (which, as we’ve established, the vast majority of their consumers will never actually read), Sen. Brown instead suggests a restrictive legal framework that will dictate, by statute, when and how data processors may use consumer’s personal data, and to what extent.
CYDigital/marteq.ios insight:

B2C companies need to get way ahead of data privacy restrictions, and not play to the existing parameters. Rather, you need anticipate the most restrictive data privacy environment possible, and determine how to work within this forecast. One such solution: give your consumers control over their own data, and ask permission to access it in exchange for a reward. Studies show this approach works.

 

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When it comes to customer data, they should always willingly opt-in - ClickZ

When it comes to customer data, they should always willingly opt-in - ClickZ | The MarTech Alert | Scoop.it
Maine’s new data privacy law is an essential step to protect customers that should be emulated throughout the country
Customer data fuels the advertising and marketing strategies for most companies, but that doesn’t mean that customers should lose their ability to control their own data
Customers should be able to easily opt-in and opt-out of having their data collected, and also have a clear view of what opting-in means
The end goal of all customer data collection should be to provide an enhanced customer experience that makes customers want to share their data
CYDigital/marteq.ios insight:

Consumers are willing to exchange their data for rewards. This has been shown over and over again. So allowing consumers to collect and control their data relative to your company is the failsafe approach to a deep relationship with the consumer based on trust. Opt-in not necessary!

 

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What’s Next for US Data Privacy Regulation – Adweek

What’s Next for US Data Privacy Regulation – Adweek | The MarTech Alert | Scoop.it
“There’s real justified concern for that 79% of Americans who are looking at the landscape and seeing what is a fragmented regulatory structure,” said Chris D’Angelo, chief deputy attorney general for economic justice at the New York attorney general’s office. “There’s no question that as a country we would be better off with federal legislation that laid the foundation for what our privacy expectations are.”

As far as what role that federal legislation should play, D’Angelo said he disagreed with other NexTech panelists on how much states can do in the meantime, or to bolster federal regulations after they’re established. “I think there’s certainly room for states to go above and beyond whatever federal floor is set,” he said.
CYDigital/marteq.ios insight:

Consider the prospective nightmare of adhering to 50 different state data privacy guidelines. Don't throw software at the problem. Give the consumers ownership!

 

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Most consumers believe government regulation should help address privacy risks - Help Net Security

Most consumers believe government regulation should help address privacy risks - Help Net Security | The MarTech Alert | Scoop.it
The research points to a privacy gap between the consumer data protection individuals want and what industry and regulators provide. While the majority of consumers want their data protected, they’re still waiting on — or expecting – the federal government or industries to provide this protection.

For instance, 60% of consumers believe government regulation should help address the privacy risks facing consumers today, of which 34% say government regulation is needed to protect personal privacy and 26% believe a hybrid option (regulation and self-regulation) should be pursued.
CYDigital/marteq.ios insight:

More stats when you click through, but the bottom line for B2C and B2B companies: get ahead of legislation.

 

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CCPA Puts Consumers in Charge and the Regs Should Too - MarTech Series

CCPA Puts Consumers in Charge and the Regs Should Too - MarTech Series | The MarTech Alert | Scoop.it
In the latest modifications, however, the draft regulations could have explained more about one critical component. The law clearly puts consumers in charge of whether or not they opt-out of the sale of their information. But the most recent modifications to the regulatory language introduce certain ambiguity that some read as empowering third parties to make that choice for them, including a small group of browser operators. 

In the latest modification, the AG issued earlier this month, however, that last sentence was struck. On first reading, some privacy advocates and others, including myself, misread that to mean that the current “Do Not Track” settings would become the defacto “Do Not Sell” settings and have the power of law. On second reading that doesn’t seem to be the case because a prohibition on tracking and a prohibition on selling are two different things. 
CYDigital/marteq.ios insight:

This will shortly be addressed by CA.

 

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Republican COVID-19 Privacy Bill Draws More Criticism - MediaPost

The COVID-19 Consumer Data Protection Act, introduced Thursday would generally require companies to obtain people's express consent before gathering data health, device, geolocation, or proximity, in order to trace the contacts of people diagnosed with the virus.

The bill also would require companies to either delete or “de-identify” all personally identifiable information when it is no longer being used for the COVID-19 outbreak.

Sponsors say the measure “would provide all Americans with more transparency, choice, and control over the collection and use of their personal health, device, geolocation, and proximity data,” and “hold businesses accountable to consumers if they use personal data to fight the COVID-19 pandemic.”

But critics say the proposed legislation has some broad exceptions that could undermine people's privacy. One of the biggest, according to advocacy group Free Press, is that the measure exempts employers from its mandates.
CYDigital/marteq.ios insight:

Pro or con, the legislation is yet another example as to how corporate privacy protection technologies and processes need to adapt on an ongoing basis. 

 

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New report shows consumers want privacy, are unaware of new data privacy regulations - Yahoo News

While 89% of consumers say data privacy is important, more than half (55%) are unaware of any data privacy regulation, according to a new study by Integral Ad Science (IAS), the global leader in digital ad verification. In the past two decades, the ability to collect consumer data online has revolutionized the field of digital advertising, but new privacy regulations in the US and worldwide have begun to restrict certain targeting strategies. To find out more, IAS surveyed 1,093 US consumers on their perceptions of targeted digital advertising practices and data collection.

A majority of consumers say they are taking responsibility for securing their data; 53% of consumers hold themselves most accountable for keeping their personal information secure, with only 36% holding websites and apps most responsible, and just 10% holding the government most accountable. More than half of consumers have taken action to help limit data collection when they are online, such as clearing their browser history or using a private or "incognito" window. Just 39% responded that they have used an ad-blocker while browsing online.
CYDigital/marteq.ios insight:

The lack of awareness of data privacy legislation is a government marketing problem, and not pertinent. What is important: that over half of consumer hold themselves responsible for keeping their information secure! This is a strong base to support the notion that consumers want to take some action to keep their information secure, so offering them the opportunity to capture and control all of their behavioral data will be well received.

 

marteq.io delivers zero party data solutions that significantly reduce digital advertising costs. Learn more: https://www.marteq.io #martech #marketing #adtech

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New CA Privacy Rights Act CPRA Makes 2020 Ballot - National Law Review

New CA Privacy Rights Act CPRA Makes 2020 Ballot - National Law Review | The MarTech Alert | Scoop.it
The organization known as Californians for Consumer Privacy announced yesterday that it successfully secured enough signatures to qualify adding the California Privacy Rights Act (“CPRA”) to the state’s November 2020 ballot.  The group’s founder Alastair Mactaggart is a well-know public figure who was the driving force behind the infamous California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (the “CCPA”), which just went into effect in January.  We previously reported on the latest CCPA developments and litigation trends at length here. 

As of yesterday, over 900,000 signatures were secured from Californians, and still counting.  

The CPRA was introduced in order to amend the CCPA—the law, which has been widely criticized for its overbroad definitions, ambiguous language, and overall lack of clarity.  The CPRA, therefore, aims to expand the privacy rights of California residents and to further increase the companies’ compliance obligations.  
CYDigital/marteq.ios insight:

More forthcoming! Please click through to see the details.

 

marteq.io delivers zero party data solutions that significantly reduce digital advertising costs. Learn more: https://www.marteq.io #martech #marketing #adtech

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