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Big Tech Is Quiet in Data Privacy Initiative Fight - TechWire

Proposition 24 on the November ballot is pitched as an expansion of California’s already robust consumer data privacy law, an iron cuff on the claws of companies that profit handsomely from tracking and selling your online search, travel and purchase habits to marketers.

But the technology giants seemingly square in its sights — the likes of Facebook, Amazon and Google — haven’t shown up to the battlefield. Instead, those opposing the new California Privacy Rights Act are some of the same types of consumer, labor and civil rights advocates who support its predecessor.

“Proposition 24 is a wolf in sheep’s clothing,” said Richard Holober, president of the Consumer Federation of California and a leader of the "No on 24" effort. “It’s loaded with giveaways to tech companies.”

Big tech companies are standing down on Proposition 24 — data privacy is popular, fighting it is a bad look, and they're already abiding by similar rules in Europe. But criticism from those who would seem natural allies is “pretty disappointing.”
CYDigital/marteq.ios insight:

For us marketer, as we need to know is this: assume it's going to happen, and plan accordingly.

 

Get the new whitepaper "Discover New Revenue Opportunities Using Extended Zero-Party Data": http://un.marteq.io/WP1/ #martech #marketing

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CPRA Pushes "Privacy by Design" Shift for Software Developers - Dev Pro Journal

CPRA Pushes "Privacy by Design" Shift for Software Developers - Dev Pro Journal | The MarTech Alert | Scoop.it
The California Privacy Rights Act (CPRA) is on the ballot this November, and if it passes will expand the privacy rights within the existing California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA).  The new law builds on the principles of data minimization, greater consumer control of personal data, and increased transparency on data retention and potential uses. It could have unforeseen implications for many companies who think their data is secure, and new opportunities for software developers and ISVs moving to “privacy by design” software development.

Compliance with the CPRA guidelines will require operational and system upgrades in data capture, storage, governance and security for all three domains. The main technologies needs are around:
Data mapping and cataloging. Personal data must be tracked across an organization’s entire IT landscape. 
Data minimization. A major component of the CPRA and similar privacy laws is the belief that organizations should only collect the bare minimum of data required to complete an interaction or transaction.
Data anonymity. In any instance when data is not critical to the function of the application, it should be anonymized in order to reduce the risk of data breaches.
Data access requests. Gartner estimates that every data access request costs about $1,400 when processed manually. Organizations will look for solutions that manage data access and sharing securely and efficiently.
CYDigital/marteq.ios insight:

The forthcoming CPRA will turn data collection completely upside down, especially for marketers. The sooner you give data ownership to the consumer, the better your relationship with the consumer and your ability to adjust to the CPRA.

 

Get the new whitepaper "Discover New Revenue Opportunities Using Extended Zero-Party Data": http://un.marteq.io/WP1/ #martech #marketing

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What CCPA-affected businesses need to know about California’s next privacy initiative | ComplianceWeek

What CCPA-affected businesses need to know about California’s next privacy initiative | ComplianceWeek | The MarTech Alert | Scoop.it
Businesses with operations in California should expect their data privacy compliance obligations to get a lot more complicated next year. That’s because voters may choose to replace the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA)—the country’s only currently enacted data privacy law, which took effect Jan. 1—with the California Privacy Rights Act (CPRA). The Nov. 3 California state ballot asks voters to approve Proposition 24 and enact the CPRA. The law would expand the definition of sensitive personal information and add a host of new data collection, use, and storage compliance requirements for businesses, many of which are still struggling to comply with the CCPA.

In addition, Proposition 24 proposes to take regulation and enforcement of the CCPA away from the California Attorney General’s Office and place those functions in the hands of a new independent entity, the California Privacy Protection Agency (PPA).

While the CPRA would take effect Jan. 1, 2023, the new agency could begin work as soon as July 1, 2021, supported with $10 million a year in state funds. And that new agency would enforce the CCPA until the CPRA takes effect.
CYDigital/marteq.ios insight:

Consider CPRA, which will pass, to be as onerous as the GDPR. And with $10M budget, it will be enforceable via a staff of attorneys. NOTE: the new agency could start up next year, enforcing CCPA (which does not have a budget to ensure enforcement). You've been warned.

 

Get the new whitepaper "Discover New Revenue Opportunities Using Extended Zero-Party Data": http://un.marteq.io/WP1/ #martech #marketing

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New CA Privacy Rights Act CPRA Makes 2020 Ballot - National Law Review

New CA Privacy Rights Act CPRA Makes 2020 Ballot - National Law Review | The MarTech Alert | Scoop.it
The organization known as Californians for Consumer Privacy announced yesterday that it successfully secured enough signatures to qualify adding the California Privacy Rights Act (“CPRA”) to the state’s November 2020 ballot.  The group’s founder Alastair Mactaggart is a well-know public figure who was the driving force behind the infamous California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (the “CCPA”), which just went into effect in January.  We previously reported on the latest CCPA developments and litigation trends at length here. 

As of yesterday, over 900,000 signatures were secured from Californians, and still counting.  

The CPRA was introduced in order to amend the CCPA—the law, which has been widely criticized for its overbroad definitions, ambiguous language, and overall lack of clarity.  The CPRA, therefore, aims to expand the privacy rights of California residents and to further increase the companies’ compliance obligations.  
CYDigital/marteq.ios insight:

More forthcoming! Please click through to see the details.

 

marteq.io delivers zero party data solutions that significantly reduce digital advertising costs. Learn more: https://www.marteq.io #martech #marketing #adtech

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