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What the loss of third-party cookies means for IT departments - TechTarget

What the loss of third-party cookies means for IT departments - TechTarget | The Marteq Alert | Scoop.it
In a year that stressed every business operation, the loss of third-party cookies may seem a minor inconvenience. But cookies are at the heart of a huge advertising ecosystem. Replacing them will require changes in how ads are purchased, targeted and measured, impacting data, systems, processes and people. The details of those changes are not yet clear, but a strong foundation of customer data will be needed under any circumstances. IT departments that improve their customer data today will have a head start on whatever demands the future may bring.

CYDigital/marteq.io's insight:

Bottom-line: first-party data is inferior to zero-party data. ZPD is the correct and robust replacement for third-party cookies.

 

Collect zero party data from your consumers NOW through marteq.io's FREE pilot program. Contact joe@marteq.io to qualify. #martech #marketing

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Advertisers scramble to plan for the uncertain 'cookieless future' - Digiday

Advertisers scramble to plan for the uncertain 'cookieless future' - Digiday | The Marteq Alert | Scoop.it
With so much up in the air right now, advertisers are focused on what they do know — Google will remove cookies from its dominant browser sometime next year bar a major u-turn. Whatever advertisers’ beliefs are about how the industry has responded to this deadline, they’re slowly waking up to the idea that the answer — or at least part of it — rests on their ownership of first-party data in the absence of third-party data they’d usually get from cookies. 

”I don’t know a single publisher or marketer that doesn’t have the “cookieless future” as a top priority right now,” said John Lee, corporate chief strategy officer at Merkle and president of the agency’s identity resolution platform Merkury. “The upcoming changes have gone from theoretical to very real and marketers are now starting to determine their plans to test various cookieless identity technologies [in 2021].”

That said, advertisers have been content to stick with what they know —Google. Six in ten (64%) of ad buyers have used Google for identity resolution at some point over the last 12 months, per a survey of 302 marketers and agency execs conducted by Advertiser Perceptions. Still, marketers know better than to put all their eggs in the Google basket.
CYDigital/marteq.io's insight:

Collect zero party data from your consumers NOW through marteq.io's FREE pilot program. Contact joe@marteq.io to qualify. #martech #marketing

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Google Stock, Apple Stock: Outlook for Digital Advertising As Cookie Crumbles - Investors Business Daily

Google Stock, Apple Stock: Outlook for Digital Advertising As Cookie Crumbles - Investors Business Daily | The Marteq Alert | Scoop.it
Digital media publishers are scrambling to develop new tracking methods that let digital advertisers track consumer activity across multiple websites.

Ad tech firm Trade Desk's universal identifier has gained traction. Its tool for web publishers aims to fight companies that operate "walled gardens."

These closed online environments such as Google, Facebook, Amazon.com and social media platforms Pinterest (PINS) and Snap (SNAP) don't need third-party cookies or device identifiers because they can track actions by their logged-in users. The walled-garden firms share only limited data with advertisers and agencies but make liberal use of it themselves.
CYDigital/marteq.io's insight:

Collect zero party data from your consumers NOW through marteq.io's FREE pilot program. Contact joe@marteq.io to qualify. #martech #marketing

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What's the Alternative to Third-Party Cookies? - CMSwire

What's the Alternative to Third-Party Cookies? - CMSwire | The Marteq Alert | Scoop.it
Regardless of how you feel about third-party cookies, we can all agree this new direction will improve user privacy. Just as you don’t hear many arguments against seat belts, I can’t expect many people to line up on the side of less privacy or transparency. So what is the argument for third-party cookies and why is there any controversy surrounding their dissolution?

The argument is simple. When used correctly, third-party cookies can be very effective in helping marketers render relevant and improved user experiences. Relevant ads are more effective for advertisers and less off-putting to users.

Getting rid of third-party cookies wouldn’t only decimate relevancy and experience, but also things we take for granted.
CYDigital/marteq.io's insight:

There is no argument for 3rd party cookies, as the argument has been decimated by platform, publisher and advertiser behavior. It's toast. Shift to zero-party data: it's a far far better source, and it respects privacy.

 

Collect zero party data from your consumers NOW through marteq.io's FREE pilot program. Contact joe@marteq.io to qualify. #martech #marketing

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UK looking into Google's changes to Chrome 'privacy sandbox' changes - Engadget

UK looking into Google's changes to Chrome 'privacy sandbox' changes - Engadget | The Marteq Alert | Scoop.it
Google is planning to eliminate third-party cookies in its Chrome browser by 2022, which sounds like a good thing for consumers worried about privacy. However, UK’s competition regulator has announced that its investigating the changes, out of concern that advertising dollars could “become even more concentrated on Google’s ecosystem at the expense of its competitors.”

To increase privacy while still allowing personalized ads, Google introduced something called the Privacy Sandbox project back in 2019. The aim is to banish third-party cookies that allow for bot fraud and fingerprinting that can track you across the internet. Those would be replaced by “trust tokens” that would still let advertisers provide relevant ads without tying the data to an individual.

The UK’s Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) said it found in a recent study that “[Google] could undermine the ability of publishers to generate revenue and undermine competition in digital advertising, entrenching Google’s market power.” It also said that it has received complaints from a group representing newspaper publishers and technology companies, alleging that Google may be “abusing its dominant position.”
CYDigital/marteq.io's insight:

All the more reason to seriously review and invest in extended zero party data!

 

Collect zero party data from your consumers NOW through marteq.io's FREE pilot program. Contact joe@marteq.io to qualify. #martech #marketing

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2020 Was All About Digital Identity – And Expect The Same In 2021 - AdExchanger

2020 Was All About Digital Identity – And Expect The Same In 2021 - AdExchanger | The Marteq Alert | Scoop.it
Despite lots of talk and thought leadership, the industry isn’t prepared for the end of third-party cookies or Apple’s imminent IDFA changes.

Marketers have “completely squandered” the extra time they got when Apple extended its IDFA change deadline to early 2021, said Nathan Levin, CEO and founder of mobile consultancy Mobile UA Ltd. In some cases, this was a result of “pure ineptitude,” he said, in others a result of upper management not dedicating the resources to support alternative solutions at the growth team’s request. Some traffic vendors have also dragged their heels on making the necessary integrations.

Not everyone believes Google will go through with it in 2021. Jeff Green, for example, CEO and founder of The Trade Desk, has said on multiple occasions that he doubts Google will actually pull the plug. Bob Regular, CEO of Infolinks, predicts that even if Google continues with its plan to terminate third-party cookies in its browser, it'll at least extend its self-imposed deadline. Why? Antitrust, baby.
CYDigital/marteq.io's insight:

Of course marketers are not ready for the loss of 3rd party cookies: saw the same level of reaction when Canada's CASL and the EU's GDPR were enacted. 

 

Get the new whitepaper "Discover New Revenue Opportunities Using Extended Zero-Party Data": http://un.marteq.io/WP1/ #martech #marketing

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Amazon, Google, Verizon succeed amid shift from third-party cookies - Business Insider

Amazon, Google, Verizon succeed amid shift from third-party cookies - Business Insider | The Marteq Alert | Scoop.it
Unsurprisingly, the largest DSPs were considered to be in the best position to navigate that shift—among them were Amazon (with 69% of marketers agreeing it was in a positive position), Google (63%), and Verizon (55%). And the dominance of these companies' DSPs extends beyond their capacity to shift to alternative trackers—those three are also the top-considered DSPs for connected TV (CTV) advertising, for example.

With CTV on the rise and the shift to third-party alternatives imminent, we could see these top players gain more market share in the coming year.
CYDigital/marteq.io's insight:

Very narrow thinking, without considering all the alternatives.

 

Get the new whitepaper "Discover New Revenue Opportunities Using Extended Zero-Party Data": http://un.marteq.io/WP1/ #martech #marketing

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RIP third-party cookies: Are marketers ready? | Ad Age

RIP third-party cookies: Are marketers ready? | Ad Age | The Marteq Alert | Scoop.it
To explore the marketer’s mindset relative to third-party cookie deprecation, Epsilon commissioned a third-party research study with Phronesis Partners Inc.:

1. Most marketers are very or moderately reliant on third-party cookies.
 
2. Less than half of marketers feel “very prepared” for the change.
 
3. Actual benefits to consumers are in question.
 
4. 70% of marketers believe digital advertising will take a step backward.
CYDigital/marteq.io's insight:

You can access the study here: https://us.epsilon.com/resources/marketer-playbook-how-to-succeed-without-third-party-cookies

 

Get the new whitepaper "Discover New Revenue Opportunities Using Extended Zero-Party Data": http://un.marteq.io/WP1/ #martech #marketing

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How The Telegraph Is Building a Future Free From Third-Party Cookies - AdWeek

How The Telegraph Is Building a Future Free From Third-Party Cookies - AdWeek | The Marteq Alert | Scoop.it
The Telegraph has been building up its first-party data trove since introducing its subscriber-first strategy in 2017. In October, it had 525,000 print and digital subscribers, plus 6.8 million registered users (who can access several articles a week in exchange for an email address), nearing its goal of 1 million subscribers and 10 million registrants by 2023.

With Unity, ad buyers can use their own first-party data pools to locate and match audiences. Using secure data clean rooms called bunkers from tech platform InfoSum, marketers can only target The Telegraph audience that overlaps with the marketers’ own databases. These types of second-party data deals have been gaining steam now that there are more reliable ways to guarantee against the leakage of valuable data.

Third-party cookies have a limited shelf life, and publishers like The Washington Post, Insider and Vice are exploring a future without them. Ad buyers can still target audiences using cookie-based identifiers, but they are becoming less effective as web browser makers increase opacity to protect user privacy.
CYDigital/marteq.io's insight:

The publishers collects a boatload of first party data on its consumers, and correlates the data with the advertiser's first party data to derive targeting. Yet it's still short of direct delivery of data from consumers to advertisers. It's a step up, but still not nearly as powerful as extended zero party data.

 

See how extended zero-party data is your greatest marketing resource...tap into it right now!: http://un.marteq.io/WP1/ #martech #marketing

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Summary of “What Comes After Third-Party Cookies?” Guide from OneTrust - The Drum

Summary of “What Comes After Third-Party Cookies?” Guide from OneTrust - The Drum | The Marteq Alert | Scoop.it
As third-party cookies go away, businesses should shift their strategy to collect data and identify personalized preferences. This allows businesses to build trust while providing the control and personalization consumers want. But what are the steps to building this new strategy?

First, there needs to be a shift in three main areas: audience, brand, and reporting. For marketers, publishers, and advertisers alike, it’s important to think about privacy and building trust with audiences in a way that impacts the KPIs with which they’re tasked.

Next, in order to establish trust and transparency with customers moving forward, marketers, publishers, and advertisers will need to build an internal privacy strategy. This consent and preferences strategy should aim to achieve five goals: put users in control, have an opt-down strategy, show custom preferences and profile data, monitor engagement insights and analytics, and sync with marketing and IT systems.
CYDigital/marteq.io's insight:

More info on how we're all impacted by the loss of 3rd party cookies (and good riddance). The paper is available behind a reg form. 

 

See how extended zero-party data is your greatest marketing resource...and you can tap into it right now!: http://un.marteq.io/WP1/ #martech #marketing

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