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3 Differences Between the CCPA and the CPRA - Business Insider

"Whereas the CCPA focuses primarily on regulating personal information that could be used to identify an individual, such as IP addresses and social security numbers, the CPRA introduces an additional category called "sensitive personal information." The latter category includes information like ethnicity and religious beliefs. From the perspective of cloud management and security teams, this means that more types of data that may be stored in cloud environments are subject to regulation under the CPRA.

 

Additional consumer rights are a second key difference between the CCPA and the CPRA. Under the CPRA, not only will consumers have rights involving knowing about and deleting data that companies collect about them, but they will also be able to request data correction. In addition, the CPRA provides consumers with new rights involving knowing about and opting out of automated decision-making processes, including the data that powers them.

 

A third important new requirement under the CPRA is mandatory risk assessments and audits. Companies will be required to submit the results of these assessments to California regulators on a "regular basis," a requirement absent from the CCPA. The teeth behind the CPRA will be a new agency, the California Privacy Protection Agency, the first dedicated agency of its kind in the US with rulemaking, auditing, investigation and enforcement authority.

CYDigital/marteq.io's insight:

If you're like most marketers, you're just not prepared for this. You have to be. It's the law.

 

Collect zero party data from your consumers NOW through marteq.io's FREE pilot program. Contact joe@marteq.io to qualify. #martech #marketing

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Key FAQs on CPRA Consumer Data Protection - The National Law Review

Key FAQs on CPRA Consumer Data Protection - The National Law Review | The Marteq Alert | Scoop.it
  • Does the CPRA require companies to publish the data retention period that applies to the personal information it collects from consumers?
  • Does the CPRA require that companies get opt-in consent from consumers before collecting their sensitive personal information?
  • Does the CPRA give consumers a right to object to a business’s continuing use of sensitive personal information?
  • Is the CPRA’s right to object to the continued use of sensitive personal information an absolute right?
CYDigital/marteq.io's insight:

If you sell product/services to consumers in CA, and most likely you do, you need to click through to read the answers to these questions, AND you need to plan for the myriad of requirements.

 

See how extended zero-party data is your greatest marketing resource...tap into it right now!: http://un.marteq.io/WP1/ #martech #marketing

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CA's Prop 24 Vote Could Boost Bills In NY, WA - PYMNTS

CA's Prop 24 Vote Could Boost Bills In NY, WA - PYMNTS | The Marteq Alert | Scoop.it
A ballot measure passed by a sizable majority of California voters to ramp up protections for online privacy could pave the way for similar measures across the country.

More than half of Golden State voters – or 56 percent – voted in favor of Proposition 24, designed to bolster a California consumer privacy rights bill passed last year.

Given California’s size and its historical role as a national trend-setter, observers see the tough new privacy law as likely to spur action by other states over the coming years.

California is the first state to pass a major online privacy bill, with New York and Washington now considering their own legislation.
CYDigital/marteq.io's insight:

Passed, giving CCPA some teeth.  Now you MUST be prepared.

 

See how extended zero-party data is your greatest marketing resource...tap into it right now!: http://un.marteq.io/WP1/ #martech #marketing

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Big Tech Is Quiet in Data Privacy Initiative Fight - TechWire

Proposition 24 on the November ballot is pitched as an expansion of California’s already robust consumer data privacy law, an iron cuff on the claws of companies that profit handsomely from tracking and selling your online search, travel and purchase habits to marketers.

But the technology giants seemingly square in its sights — the likes of Facebook, Amazon and Google — haven’t shown up to the battlefield. Instead, those opposing the new California Privacy Rights Act are some of the same types of consumer, labor and civil rights advocates who support its predecessor.

“Proposition 24 is a wolf in sheep’s clothing,” said Richard Holober, president of the Consumer Federation of California and a leader of the "No on 24" effort. “It’s loaded with giveaways to tech companies.”

Big tech companies are standing down on Proposition 24 — data privacy is popular, fighting it is a bad look, and they're already abiding by similar rules in Europe. But criticism from those who would seem natural allies is “pretty disappointing.”
CYDigital/marteq.io's insight:

For us marketer, as we need to know is this: assume it's going to happen, and plan accordingly.

 

Get the new whitepaper "Discover New Revenue Opportunities Using Extended Zero-Party Data": http://un.marteq.io/WP1/ #martech #marketing

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CPRA Pushes "Privacy by Design" Shift for Software Developers - Dev Pro Journal

CPRA Pushes "Privacy by Design" Shift for Software Developers - Dev Pro Journal | The Marteq Alert | Scoop.it
The California Privacy Rights Act (CPRA) is on the ballot this November, and if it passes will expand the privacy rights within the existing California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA).  The new law builds on the principles of data minimization, greater consumer control of personal data, and increased transparency on data retention and potential uses. It could have unforeseen implications for many companies who think their data is secure, and new opportunities for software developers and ISVs moving to “privacy by design” software development.

Compliance with the CPRA guidelines will require operational and system upgrades in data capture, storage, governance and security for all three domains. The main technologies needs are around:
Data mapping and cataloging. Personal data must be tracked across an organization’s entire IT landscape. 
Data minimization. A major component of the CPRA and similar privacy laws is the belief that organizations should only collect the bare minimum of data required to complete an interaction or transaction.
Data anonymity. In any instance when data is not critical to the function of the application, it should be anonymized in order to reduce the risk of data breaches.
Data access requests. Gartner estimates that every data access request costs about $1,400 when processed manually. Organizations will look for solutions that manage data access and sharing securely and efficiently.
CYDigital/marteq.io's insight:

The forthcoming CPRA will turn data collection completely upside down, especially for marketers. The sooner you give data ownership to the consumer, the better your relationship with the consumer and your ability to adjust to the CPRA.

 

Get the new whitepaper "Discover New Revenue Opportunities Using Extended Zero-Party Data": http://un.marteq.io/WP1/ #martech #marketing

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What CCPA-affected businesses need to know about California’s next privacy initiative | ComplianceWeek

What CCPA-affected businesses need to know about California’s next privacy initiative | ComplianceWeek | The Marteq Alert | Scoop.it
Businesses with operations in California should expect their data privacy compliance obligations to get a lot more complicated next year. That’s because voters may choose to replace the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA)—the country’s only currently enacted data privacy law, which took effect Jan. 1—with the California Privacy Rights Act (CPRA). The Nov. 3 California state ballot asks voters to approve Proposition 24 and enact the CPRA. The law would expand the definition of sensitive personal information and add a host of new data collection, use, and storage compliance requirements for businesses, many of which are still struggling to comply with the CCPA.

In addition, Proposition 24 proposes to take regulation and enforcement of the CCPA away from the California Attorney General’s Office and place those functions in the hands of a new independent entity, the California Privacy Protection Agency (PPA).

While the CPRA would take effect Jan. 1, 2023, the new agency could begin work as soon as July 1, 2021, supported with $10 million a year in state funds. And that new agency would enforce the CCPA until the CPRA takes effect.
CYDigital/marteq.io's insight:

Consider CPRA, which will pass, to be as onerous as the GDPR. And with $10M budget, it will be enforceable via a staff of attorneys. NOTE: the new agency could start up next year, enforcing CCPA (which does not have a budget to ensure enforcement). You've been warned.

 

Get the new whitepaper "Discover New Revenue Opportunities Using Extended Zero-Party Data": http://un.marteq.io/WP1/ #martech #marketing

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New CA Privacy Rights Act CPRA Makes 2020 Ballot - National Law Review

New CA Privacy Rights Act CPRA Makes 2020 Ballot - National Law Review | The Marteq Alert | Scoop.it
The organization known as Californians for Consumer Privacy announced yesterday that it successfully secured enough signatures to qualify adding the California Privacy Rights Act (“CPRA”) to the state’s November 2020 ballot.  The group’s founder Alastair Mactaggart is a well-know public figure who was the driving force behind the infamous California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (the “CCPA”), which just went into effect in January.  We previously reported on the latest CCPA developments and litigation trends at length here. 

As of yesterday, over 900,000 signatures were secured from Californians, and still counting.  

The CPRA was introduced in order to amend the CCPA—the law, which has been widely criticized for its overbroad definitions, ambiguous language, and overall lack of clarity.  The CPRA, therefore, aims to expand the privacy rights of California residents and to further increase the companies’ compliance obligations.  
CYDigital/marteq.io's insight:

More forthcoming! Please click through to see the details.

 

marteq.io delivers zero party data solutions that significantly reduce digital advertising costs. Learn more: https://www.marteq.io #martech #marketing #adtech

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